RAKAIA

BRITISH MERCHANT NAVY CADET TRAINING SHIPS

M.V. FOURAH BAY

Launched on the 7th September 1961 by Mrs J Paine, the Fourah Bay was built by Scotts’ Shipbuilding and Engineering Company Limited in Greenock.

 

Technical Data on Fourah Bay indicates that she was a cargo-passenger vessel of 7,704 gross tons with a length overall of 465 feet 0 inches. Her 5 cylinder, 2 cycle, single-acting diesel engine gave her a service speed of 16 knots.

 

Fourah Bay was specifically designed to be the Company’s cadet training ship, and she entered service in this role in December 1961. She carried a total of 18 apprentices, who were designated as midshipmen by the Company, and their cabins were situated on both the promenade and upper decks. In addition, the midshipmen were provided with a study and a duty mess on the upper deck. Usually, a midshipman would spend 2 or 3 voyages on Fourah Bay, totalling approximately 9 to 12 months, and the remaining sea-time under articles would be spent on other vessels in the Company’s fleet.

 

Although Fourah Bay was not equipped with a schoolroom, midshipmen were required to study through a correspondence course, and one of the deck officers was made responsible for their training and welfare.

 

Fourah Bay ceased to be the Company’s cadet training ship in the summer of 1969.

 

Photographs and anecdotes are a great way to show that midshipmen not only worked hard but played hard.

 

Any material that you would like to display would be most gratefully received.

So far, it has not proved possible to obtain a copy of a capacity plan for Fourah Bay, but a small amount of data gleaned from such sources as Lloyds Register of Shipping and magazine articles is available for download as a pdf. If anyone has a capacity plan for Fourah Bay, it would be mostly gratefully received. Once copied, the original would be returned to the owner.

 

Technical information on Fourah Bay’s main engine, with supporting photographs, is available for download as a pdf.

 

An interesting article on Fourah Bay appeared in the March, 1962, edition of The Motor Ship, and it, together with a stunning photograph of Fourah Bay, is available for download as a pdf.

Any anecdotes that you may have of Fourah Bay would be most gratefully received.

  Fourah Bay Data

 

  Fourah Bay Engine

 

  Motor Ship Article